How to Convert a Non-Responsive Website into a Responsive Website

Author’s note: There are many articles and blogs floating around the InterWeb today that provide a technical response to this matter. These postings deal heavily with grid-based frameworks, breakpoints, media queries, CSS3, HTML5, etc. and are intended for a professional web industry audience. I will attempt to explain the process from a more practical, customer-centric and non-technical perspective. If you are a marketing manager or small business owner and find yourself tasked with taking your existing website and making it responsive I hope that this article will be useful.

The Coming of Responsive Web Design.

In 2013, Responsive Web Design became the defacto industry standard in web development. Responsive Web Design represents a new approach to building websites that optimizes the user experience across all platforms and mobile devices. If you own or manage a website it is imperative that you invest in the mobile user experience, and Responsive Web Design is the most complete solution to this complex problem. A typical business updates its web presence on a fairly predictable cycle. On average, a corporate website will last between 2-5 years before it’s time for an overhaul. In the market now? No problem. Any web developer worth its salt will propose that the new site be built using a responsive framework. If you are currently in discussions with a web agency and this is not the case I have only one thing to say to you: RUN, Forrest! RUN!

Houston, we have a problem.

All is well for site managers that fit within this cycle and are ready to build their new site from scratch using Responsive Web Design. Ideally, a responsive site should be built from scratch as the design and the framework both strongly influence how well the site adapts to different devices and screen sizes. But what about those poor unfortunate souls that somehow missed out on the responsive coronation? You have a shiny, new  (and most likely expensive) website that you took great pride in – at least prior to hearing about this new ‘responsive thingy’. You find yourself stuck with a web presence that was outdated and uncompetitive prior to it ever going live. And, perhaps worst of all, you did not plan for budgeting to fix the problem. What to do, what to do?

First off, DO NOT PANIC. Take solace in the fact that you are not alone. I receive several requests each week from managers in organizations large and small that are in this spot. There is a timely and cost-effective solution.

Transitioning into Responsive Design.

Let’s begin with the basic question that defines the problem: How can we convert an existing, non-responsive website into a responsive website?

Before we can begin to answer this question, we must determine what kind of website you currently have. Is your website driven dynamically by a content management system (CMS), such as WordPress, or is it a compilation of static, HTML pages? If you do not know the answer you will need to check with your IT staff or the original site developer as this is critical to the conversion process.

Now, to transition to a responsive design, we must:

    1. Assessment. To begin with the conversion process, we must first review the site design, layout and structure to ensure that it can fit within the responsive framework. This may require some tweaking of the original designs and layout, and not all sites are compatible for conversion.
    2. Information Architecture. Once we can confirm compatibility we will create interactive HTML wireframes that will demonstrate how the existing content will display for desktop, tablet and smartphones. The number of wireframes will vary by project and an understanding of user behavior via analytics will help us determine the types of mobile devices current site visitors are using. If, for whatever reason, you have a lot of users on Kindle Fire coming to your site (not that THIS will ever happen), we will need to ensure that the conversion takes this particular device into account.
    3. Design for Responsive. Next, we will rebuild the original design PSD’s templates to demonstrate the updated designs (based upon content and layout modifications required fro responsive conversion). As with the wireframes that precedes this step, we will provide design mockups for desktop, tablet and smartphone views. At this point, you will truly begin to see how your site will look and feel as a responsive website.
    4. HTML Prototypes. Once the design templates are approved, we go through the process of PSD2HTML, built upon a responsive framework (such as Bootstrap or Foundation).
    5. Convert the Code. We will then go through the tedious task of converting everything that was once fixed-with into a fluid, responsive layout. When moving from fixed layout to responsive design, we must establish “break points” that will trigger CSS style rules for different devices and screen sizes. Text is only one component of responsiveness. Due to the ever-increasing use of infographics, photos, and videos, images are also significant aspects of the responsive experience.
    6. Template Integration. As I have stated previously in this post, we must determine whether the existing site is static or dynamic. If the site is static, we will create responsive HTML template pages, which can be used in HTML editors such as Dreamweaver. Once these responsive templates have been introduced, the task of manually copying and pasting the existing content from each individual static page will begin. Based upon the number of pages the site has, this can either be a quick fix or a major headache. For dynamic sites, however, the solution is much more elegant. For website that use a CMS we need only replace the existing non-responsive HTML templates with the responsive HTML templates.
    7. Site Testing & QA. Finally, we will then test the converted site on multiple devices to ensure that everything is responding accordingly. The more you test your responsive site, the better the user experience will be in the end.

Although the solution is technical, the process of converting an existing non-responsive website to a responsive website, in practice, is more art than science. Each website is different and has its own unique challenges during the conversion process. For site owners like you, however, this means you no longer have to create a separate site for mobile users or make them suffer through an inferior mobile experience.

Have something to say? Leave A Comment Below.

Frank Farris

Frank Farris is Founder and CEO of DeepBlue. He has been an active thought leader in the application of emerging web technologies since 1998 and is a champion of the movement to make the Responsive Web Design approach the new industry standard.

More Posts - Website

Responsive Web Design and Search Engine Optimization: All the cool search engines are doing it.

If Google jumped off a bridge, would you jump too? The answer, in terms of search engine optimization, is yes. For those of you unfamiliar with the dark arts of search engine optimization, or SEO for short, it is the process in which a website is systematically tuned to most efficiently match the criteria that the algorithms Google, Bing, and other search engines use to determine the relevance of your website to keywords in user searches. This is how search engines determine the display rank for websites based on each search query; and they have endorsed Responsive Web Design as the best way to make sure your website is king of the keywords.

I’ll start with a little background, since this is such a hot, albeit confusing, topic. Originally, these algorithms were not intended to be catered to. However, enterprising individuals discovered the potential that search engine optimization held, and began to wield this power for great evil. The world of SEO fell into darkness…until recently. Thankfully for those of us who hate our results being populated by irrelevant advertisement websites, Google and other search engines have begun taking a very active role in cleaning up their results. They are carefully monitoring SEO practices to make sure only the most relevant and useful information is displayed.

seo diagram

Search engine tree

All the cheap tricks, (link farming, keyword spamming, cloaking, etc.) that were being used to circumvent the original purpose of the search engine (locating useful and relevant content), have been debunked. The websites who succumbed to the cheap thrills of the dark side of SEO have lost their ill-gotten ranking, and all the capital their marketing team had invested in it.

These changes have ushered in the dawn of the Golden Age for legitimate search engine optimization. Google and Bing have begun defining best practices and distributing recommendations and guidelines to help aid us in our goals to develop proper SEO while building the best websites in the world; and it all begins with the foundation. This is where Responsive Web Design comes in.

In recent articles, Google and Bing have tapped Responsive Web Design as their preferred method for building a website that will be visited by any source of mobile traffic; which is any website that exists in today’s world. Google has chosen Responsive Web Design for many reasons, but a few major ones include:

  • A single URL is easier for users to interact with, share, and link to
  • Single URLs are much easier for search engine algorithms to process
  • A singular source of HTML makes crawling the website much easier, and avoids the need to reconcile findings from different bots searching multiple HTML sources
  • Content is contained in one source, enhancing keyword saturation without filler, and allowing search engines to index the content more efficiently and accurately

But what does it all mean?! Basically, the easier it is for search engines to read, analyze, and index the content on your website, the more precisely and confidently they can display that website with a high ranking when a consumer searches their engine using a related keyword.

Non responsive websites force search engines to try and reconcile content from multiple sources, and across a host of redirects, which clogs the algorithm. It’s similar to when those amazing customer service centers transfer you around for 45 minutes trying to find the “right person” to handle your problem. You don’t like it, and apparently algorithms don’t either.

All in all, SEO will still remain a moving target, and not everyone will follow the new rules, but any organization who wants to protect their web investments should do their homework when developing their SEO strategies. The major search engines have laid out their preferences for building effective long-term search optimization, and it begins with flawlessly executed Responsive Web Design.

Frank Farris

Frank Farris is Founder and CEO of DeepBlue. He has been an active thought leader in the application of emerging web technologies since 1998 and is a champion of the movement to make the Responsive Web Design approach the new industry standard.

More Posts - Website

Responsive vs. Adaptive Design: Which Approach is Best?

Those of us in the web industry have become familiar in 2012 with a new approach to website development. Responsive Web Design, or RWD for short. The promise of RWD is that it allows developers like DeepBlue to create a website from a single-data source and adjust its layout accordingly to provide an optimal viewing experience – easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling – across a wide range of devices (from desktop computer monitors to tablets to mobile phones). RWD provides an elegant solution for a complex problem – how to develop a single website that satisfies today’s multi-platform consumer. RWD is not a new technology; rather, it is a new way of thinking about the web. Although a website built using a responsive approach is self-evident when pointed out, we have found that the term creates much confusion with customers, hence the purpose of this article. To try to clarify, we will define the two main design approaches to modern website development – Responsive Design and Adaptive Design – and allow the reader to decide for themselves which approach is right for them.

Let’s begin with the basics:

Responsive Web DesignMultiple Fluid Grids

Adaptive Web DesignMultiple Fixed With Layouts

Confused? I don’t blame you.

RWD uses something with the obscure concept of fluid-based proportion grids. Instead of designing a layout based on rigid pixels or arbitrary percentage values, a fluid grid is more carefully designed in terms of proportions. This way, when a layout is squeezed onto a tiny mobile device or stretched across a huge screen, all of the elements in the layout will resize their widths in relation to one another. In addition RWD uses flexible images, and media queries, and when all three components are combined we create a quality experience for users no matter how large (or small) their display.

Make sense?

Let me try to put this in simpler terms: RWD websites are like silly putty, they have the ability to bend and curb, essentially morphing themselves into the proper dimensions for any web experience, including desktop, tablets and smartphones. For those of you who remember the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta – think Whatizit, just without all the horrible embarrassment it befell onto our fair city.

Olympics Logo

Got it? Good. Let’s move on.

Adaptive Web Design (AWD), on the other hand uses a fixed width layout in designing and developing a website. Instead of a responsive site that will adjust itself accordingly, the AWD approach is to create multiple versions of a website based upon its anticipated use. We used this approach for the Tennessee Aquarium website several years back. At that time, the iPhone had just made its glorious appearance onto the scene and users were excited about the ability to visit actual websites on their phone. Granted, of course, that the experience was not always optimal – I will not even mention Flash – we loved the fact that the geniuses at Apple were thoughtful enough to create an intuitive, gesture-based interface which allowed us to zoom in and out, making it possible to read content that was designed for a larger screen on our tiny 3.5 inch phone. For the time being, it was good enough. Soon, however, customers started complaining to us that their customers were complaining to them that their website was not very useful on their smaller devices. They asked us if we could create an alternative version of their website, designed specifically for small screens, squinty eyes and fat fingers. Witness the birth of the mobile-friendly website experience – a scaled back, dumbed down, easier to use version of what has become affectionately known across small screens everywhere as the ‘full site’. Even though the creation of a mobile version required additional cost, design, development and the creation of a sub-folder inside the CMS (thus duplicating content entry efforts), our customers were once again happy because, indeed, their customers were also happy.

Between the years 2006-2010, the Adaptive Web approach dominated mobile strategies. Essentially, we developed two websites – one for the desktop experience and one for the smartphone experience. Then, wouldn’t you know it, those geniuses at Apple introduced yet another disruptive product. The iPad. What exactly was the iPad? At the time, we were not quite sure. It wasn’t a laptop, yet it wasn’t a phone either. It was a brand new category. Inevitably, our customers started calling us asking about how we can help them optimize their tablet experience. Although the average website will default to its desktop version on a tablet, the content was not always an ideal fit, especially in portrait mode. Should we really build a third website that was optimized for tablets? Will customers actually pay for three websites? Things started to get a little murky, and that’s when we started hearing about yet another rumored device that would strike fear in the heart of designers – the iPad Mini!! Chaos ensued.

It all started to change with Responsive Web Design, an article by Ethan Marcotte on A List Apart. Essentially, the article proposed addressing the ever-changing landscape of devices, browsers, screen sizes and orientations using what you are now familiar with (thanks to this article) as the Responsive Design approach. RWD is still in it’s infancy and best-practices are being established as I write this article. It is by no means flawless – the concept of pixel-perfect has been thrown out the window along with Flash architecture. But it does represent the single greatest hope for a portable web that works the way we expect it to.

Earlier in this article, I offered to clarify the differences between RWD and AWD and allow you, the reader, to decide for yourself which approach is best for you and your organization. I realize that my intentions for objectivity may have been slightly influenced by my obvious subjectivity and preference for RWD. Still, I leave the ultimate conclusion to be made by you. If you were undertaking a new website, which approach would you choose?

RWD Rules!

Frank Farris

Frank Farris is Founder and CEO of DeepBlue. He has been an active thought leader in the application of emerging web technologies since 1998 and is a champion of the movement to make the Responsive Web Design approach the new industry standard.

More Posts - Website